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Beyoncé's 'Lemonade' Album and Information Resources: Art and Culture References

This guide supports further research into Beyoncé's literary, film, and history references in her visual album 'Lemonade.'

Pipilotti Rist

 

Video artist Pipilotti Rist's Ever Is Over All (1997)

 
Learn more: "Ever Is Over All" museum record, Museum of Modern Art.
 

Articles about directorial and artist references in Lemonade:

Is the new Beyoncé video a tribute to Pipilotti Rist? Phaidon.

Is Beyoncé's Windshield-Destroying Stroll in Lemonade Based on This '90s Art Film? by Mark Joseph Stern. Slate, April 25, 2016.

A Lot of People Are Comparing Beyoncé's 'Lemonade' to Terrence Malick by Sam Adams. Criticwire, April 24, 2016.

Watch: 7-Minute Video Essay Explores The Film Influences Behind Beyonce's 'Lemonade' by Will Ashton. Indiewire, April 27, 2016.

 

Eve's Bayou by Kasi Lemmons

Eve's Bayou (1997) by Kasi Lemmonsy is set in Louisiana in 1962 and is about a family and the father's infidelity.

Art and Culture References

Mardi Gras Indian at Jazz Fest. Tulane Public Relations.
Mardi Gras Indian at Jazz Fest, 2011. Credit: Tulane Public Relations. Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic.

The Mardi Gras Indian of 'Lemonade' by Leah Donnella. Code Switch, National Public Radio (NPR), April 27, 2016.

Followers Of The Yoruba Faith Reflect On The Impact Of Beyoncé's 'Lemonade' by Amanda Alcantara. Remezla, April 28, 2016.

What Beyonce teaches us about the African diaspora in "Lemonade" by Kamaria Roberts and Kenya Downs. PBS Newshour. April 29, 2016 

 

Daughters of the Dust by Julie Dash

DAUGHTERS OF THE DUST by Julie Dash

 

Daughters of the Dust Trailer from Floyd Webb on Vimeo.

DAUGHTERS OF THE DUST (1991) was written, directed, and produced by Julie Dash. It is the first feature-length film directed by an African American woman theatrically distributed in the U.S. DAUGHTERS OF THE DUST tells the story of three generations of Gullah women in the Peazant family on St. Helena Island in 1902 as they prepare to migrate north.

Note: Julie Dash spoke at Johns Hopkins Saturday, April 30th. See Trailblazing filmmaker Julie Dash to visit Johns Hopkins by Bret McCabe, April 27, 2016.

DAUGHTERS OF THE DUST is available for check out at the Highline College Library.


Relevant articles:

Our Dated Model of Theatrical Release Is Hurting Independent Cinema by Richard Brody. The New Yorker, April 16, 2016.


‘Daughters of the Dust,’ a Seeming Inspiration for ‘Lemonade,’ Is Restored by Mekado Murphy. The New York Times, April 27, 2016.

From the article:

Now, the film, which is on DVD only in an out-of-print version, will get new life on the big screen.

The Cohen Film Collection, which maintains a library of classic films, announced on Wednesday that it has completed a digital restoration of “Daughters of the Dust” and plans to release that version theatrically this fall as part of the reopening of the New York art house venue the Quad Cinema. A national rollout and a new Blu-ray version of the film will follow.