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Abolition

This guide explores what prison abolition is, an overview of the movement, and resources.

Washington State

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Statistics on Mass Incarceration According to Race and Gender

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Survived and Punished: A Few Quick Statistics

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The Sentencing Project: The Racial Impact of Mass Incarceration

"Sentencing policies, implicit racial bias, and socioeconomic inequity contribute to racial disparities at every level of the criminal justice system. Today, people of color make up 37% of the U.S. population but 67% of the prison population. Overall, African Americans are more likely than white Americans to be arrested; once arrested, they are more likely to be convicted; and once convicted, they are more likely to face stiff sentences. Black men are six times as likely to be incarcerated as white men and Hispanic men are more than twice as likely to be incarcerated as non-Hispanic white men."